What Children Want More Than Presents

What Children Want More Than Presents

As a parent, there’s an innate drive to shower our kids with everything under the sun. If we could, we would probably all buy our children the moon. But how would that benefit them? What life lessons would they learn from being given mountains of presents? Furthermore, children don’t want presents—well, they do—but there are far more important things you can give to them.

There are so many things that children want more than presents.

Children Want Presence

Intentional parents know that one of the main things that children want more than presents is your presence. Quality time with your kids is one of the most wonderful gifts you can give to them. Toys break. Clothes are outgrown. But that time you sat down with them and read an entire book series with them? Those memories will be treasured forever.

There’s no substitute for being there for your children. As much as you can, try to gift them with time, rather than presents.

Children Want Traditions

Remember all of those heartfelt traditions your parents got so excited about over the holidays? Everyone has at least one that they can think of off the top of their head. They’re some of the fondest moments for most people, which is why creating traditions for your family is one of the most precious gifts you could possibly give.

Like a timeless heirloom, those traditions will be passed from generation to generation, forever threading your family legacy together with strings of hope and joy.

Children Want Love

More than anything else, though, your children just want your unconditional love. Presents are lovely. Time is better. But love is what prevails above all else.

As a parent, it can be hard to accept everything that your child does. But does that ever mean you don’t love them? Absolutely not. The love of a parent should always be unconditional, and when you’re able to give that gift to your children, nothing else matters. Through that love, you can raise strong, independent, forward-thinking individuals who know how to love others deeply and pursue their dreams.

There is no greater present than that.

Tracey and Kimberly EatonWhat Children Want More Than Presents
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The Difference Between Survival Parenting and Intentional Parenting

The Difference Between Survival Parenting and Intentional Parenting

There are millions of ways to be a parent. For thousands and thousands of years, people have been raising their children—some, admittedly, better than others. Survival parenting and intentional parenting aren’t new concepts; they’ve been around as long as parenting itself. We’ve just put labels on them in modern society.

To put it simply, the difference between survival parenting and intentional parenting has everything to do with intention.

If your intention is just to survive raising your kids, you’re a survivalist parent. If, however, your intention is to raise your kids to be whole, successful, and independent, you’re an intentional parent.

Survival Parenting

“If I can just make it through the diaper-changing days…”

“If I can just make it through the terrible twos…”

“If I can just make it through the teenage years…”

At the end of those requisite 18 years, survivalist parents sigh in relief. They’ve done it. They’ve survived. But, what about the kids? More than likely, they’ve spent years being babysat by TV sets. They’ve been disciplined with extrinsic motivation in the form of bribes and threats, and as a result, they feel no intrinsic motivation to succeed. Chances are, they’ll end up right back at home sooner rather than later. Or, if they’re not inclined to couch-surf at their parents’ place, they’ll rarely, if ever, return home to visit.

In either case, survival parenting not only does the kid a great disservice, it also hurts the parents in the long run, too.

Intentional Parenting

“How can I help my child learn to do this for himself?”

“What’s best for my daughter in this situation?”

“What will I wish I had done five years from now?”

Intentional parents ask the tough questions of themselves in order to foster growth in their children. It’s not the easiest way to parent, but it’s the best for the kids in the long run. Intentional parents don’t worry about making it through the difficult stages in their children’s lives. They worry about equipping their kids to face challenges for themselves.

The Real Difference

The real difference between intentional parenting and survival parenting is in the results. Children who’ve had intentional parents grow up to be self-assured, confident, independent, successful, and well-adjusted. Children who have had survival parents may end up perfectly fine, but that will have been in spite of their upbringing, not because of it.

Of course, there’s no definitive right way to parent, but if you have the right intentions, you’re definitely on the right track.

Tracey and Kimberly EatonThe Difference Between Survival Parenting and Intentional Parenting
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